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Mikimoto Akoya Pearl Lariat Necklace in 18K Gold
Mikimoto Akoya Pearl Lariat Necklace in 18K Gold worn
Mikimoto Akoya Pearl Lariat Necklace in 18K Gold white gold
Additional Information

Gold Throughout history, gold has been one of the most sought-after metals in the world. It’s been used as currency, to decorate objects as a thing of beauty, and is also used for industrial purposes. In the jewelry industry, the word “gold,” when used by itself, means “all gold” or “pure” gold, meaning 24 karat (24K) gold. Because 24K gold is soft, it’s usually mixed with other metals called alloys to increase its hardness and durability. If a piece of jewelry is not 24 karat gold, the karat quality should accompany any claim that the item is gold. The karat quality marking tells you what proportion of gold is mixed with the other metals. Fourteen-karat (14K) jewelry contains 14/24 or 58.3% gold, with 10/24 parts of an alloy metal. The higher the karat rating, the higher the proportion of gold in the piece of jewelry. Pearl Pearls are the only gemstones made by living creatures. Mollusks produce pearls by depositing layers of calcium carbonate around microscopic irritants—usually a grain of sand, as it’s commonly believed—that get lodged in their shells. While any shelled mollusk can technically make a pearl, only two groups of bivalve mollusks (or clams) use mother-of-pearl to create the iridescent “nacreous” pearls that are valued in jewelry. These rare gemstones don’t require any polishing to reveal their natural luster. Appropriately, the name “pearl” comes from the Old French perle, from the Latin perna meaning “leg,” referencing the leg-of-mutton shape of an open mollusk shell. The finest pearls have a naturally reflective luster, making them appear creamy white with an iridescent sheen that casts many colorful hues. Cultured freshwater pearls can also be dyed yellow, green, blue, brown, pink, purple or black. Black pearls—which are mostly cultured because they are so rare in nature—aren’t actually black but rather green, purple, blue or silver. Pearls used to be found in many parts of the world, but natural pearling is now confined to the Persian Gulf waters near Bahrain. Australia owns one of the world’s last remaining pearl diving fleets and still harvests natural pearls from the Indian Ocean. Today, most freshwater cultured pearls come from China. South Sea pearls are cultured along the northwestern coastline of Australia, the Philippines, and Indonesia.

Product Care

How to Care for Gold •Gold is a soft metal prone to scratching, and is usually mixed with other alloy metals to increase it’s hardness.

•Gold has a tendency to tarnish, depending on the percentage of other metals mixed with the gold. Some cleaning materials to avoid are:
--Soap – Steer clear of any soap with unknown ingredients. Basic blue Dawn dish soap is fine, but remove your gold jewelry before showering to avoid accumulating a film from other body washes.
--Chlorine – Chlorine, especially at high temperatures like in a hot tub, can permanently damage or discolor your gold jewelry. Remember to remove it when cleaning with chlorine bleach, too!

•The best way to clean gold jewelry is to take it to a professional jeweler for cleaning. How to Care for Pearls •Clean your pearls with a soft cloth after each wear. This helps to prevent the buildup of oils and other material from handling.

•If pearls become stained, clean with lukewarm water and baking soda with a soft cleaning cloth. Never submerge a pearl necklace in water as this will weaken the silk strand. Also, remember to let your pearls dry completely before putting them away.

•Make sure to visit a professional jeweler at least twice a year for a thorough inspection and professional cleaning.

Shipping Info

Shipping Policy •All orders ship Free of charge with UPS or Fedex

•Call us at 541-345-0354 if you require next day shipping (additional fees apply)

•Please allow 1-2 days to process your order and prepare shipment

•We only ship to addresses within the United States. We are unable to process orders shipped to package forwarding services at this time.

Sourcing

At Skeie's, it's of upmost importance that the jewelry we select is obtained from suppliers who follow conflict-free and socially responsible practices. We believe that the materials used in our jewelry should support and benefit the communities where they originated, while keeping the environmental impact as minimal as possible.

$1,750.00

Mikimoto Akoya Pearl Lariat Necklace in 18K Gold

This Mikimoto pearl necklace features a 7.5mm, A+, pearl on an 18K yellow or white gold 20 inch chain with adjustable lariat.

Details

  • 7.5mm Akoya Cultured Pearl
  • 18K yellow or white gold
  • 20 inch chain

Free Shipping

No Sales Tax


Money Back Guarantee

Free Shipping

No Sales Tax


Money Back Guarantee

Color Yellow

Only 1 left in stock

Additional Information

Gold Throughout history, gold has been one of the most sought-after metals in the world. It’s been used as currency, to decorate objects as a thing of beauty, and is also used for industrial purposes. In the jewelry industry, the word “gold,” when used by itself, means “all gold” or “pure” gold, meaning 24 karat (24K) gold. Because 24K gold is soft, it’s usually mixed with other metals called alloys to increase its hardness and durability. If a piece of jewelry is not 24 karat gold, the karat quality should accompany any claim that the item is gold. The karat quality marking tells you what proportion of gold is mixed with the other metals. Fourteen-karat (14K) jewelry contains 14/24 or 58.3% gold, with 10/24 parts of an alloy metal. The higher the karat rating, the higher the proportion of gold in the piece of jewelry. Pearl Pearls are the only gemstones made by living creatures. Mollusks produce pearls by depositing layers of calcium carbonate around microscopic irritants—usually a grain of sand, as it’s commonly believed—that get lodged in their shells. While any shelled mollusk can technically make a pearl, only two groups of bivalve mollusks (or clams) use mother-of-pearl to create the iridescent “nacreous” pearls that are valued in jewelry. These rare gemstones don’t require any polishing to reveal their natural luster. Appropriately, the name “pearl” comes from the Old French perle, from the Latin perna meaning “leg,” referencing the leg-of-mutton shape of an open mollusk shell. The finest pearls have a naturally reflective luster, making them appear creamy white with an iridescent sheen that casts many colorful hues. Cultured freshwater pearls can also be dyed yellow, green, blue, brown, pink, purple or black. Black pearls—which are mostly cultured because they are so rare in nature—aren’t actually black but rather green, purple, blue or silver. Pearls used to be found in many parts of the world, but natural pearling is now confined to the Persian Gulf waters near Bahrain. Australia owns one of the world’s last remaining pearl diving fleets and still harvests natural pearls from the Indian Ocean. Today, most freshwater cultured pearls come from China. South Sea pearls are cultured along the northwestern coastline of Australia, the Philippines, and Indonesia.

Product Care

How to Care for Gold •Gold is a soft metal prone to scratching, and is usually mixed with other alloy metals to increase it’s hardness.

•Gold has a tendency to tarnish, depending on the percentage of other metals mixed with the gold. Some cleaning materials to avoid are:
--Soap – Steer clear of any soap with unknown ingredients. Basic blue Dawn dish soap is fine, but remove your gold jewelry before showering to avoid accumulating a film from other body washes.
--Chlorine – Chlorine, especially at high temperatures like in a hot tub, can permanently damage or discolor your gold jewelry. Remember to remove it when cleaning with chlorine bleach, too!

•The best way to clean gold jewelry is to take it to a professional jeweler for cleaning. How to Care for Pearls •Clean your pearls with a soft cloth after each wear. This helps to prevent the buildup of oils and other material from handling.

•If pearls become stained, clean with lukewarm water and baking soda with a soft cleaning cloth. Never submerge a pearl necklace in water as this will weaken the silk strand. Also, remember to let your pearls dry completely before putting them away.

•Make sure to visit a professional jeweler at least twice a year for a thorough inspection and professional cleaning.

Shipping Info

Shipping Policy •All orders ship Free of charge with UPS or Fedex

•Call us at 541-345-0354 if you require next day shipping (additional fees apply)

•Please allow 1-2 days to process your order and prepare shipment

•We only ship to addresses within the United States. We are unable to process orders shipped to package forwarding services at this time.

Sourcing

At Skeie's, it's of upmost importance that the jewelry we select is obtained from suppliers who follow conflict-free and socially responsible practices. We believe that the materials used in our jewelry should support and benefit the communities where they originated, while keeping the environmental impact as minimal as possible.

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